Tag Archives: C#.NET

Useful Features of ASP.NET


In this post, lets discuss about some of the useful features of ASP.NET

1. Faster compilation.

This configuration setting was introduced post .NET 3.5 SP1. Add it to web.config file.

<compilation optimizeCompilations="true">

Refer MSDN for details.

2. Retail mode at the machine.config

<configuration>
  <system.web>
    <deployment retail="true"/>
  </system.web>
</configuration>

It overrides the web.config settings to enforce debug to false, turns custom errors on and disables tracing. No more forgetting to change attributes before publishing – just leave them all configured for development or test environments and update the production retail setting.

3. Intellisense for MasterPages in the content pages

Most of the time you have to use the “findcontrol” method and cast the controls in master page from the content pages when you want to use them, the MasterType directive will enable intellisense in Visual Studio once you do this

Just add one more directive to the page

<%@ MasterType VirtualPath="~/Masters/MainMasterPage.master" %>

If you don’t want to use the Virtual Path and use the class name instead

<%@ MasterType TypeName="MainMasterPage" %>

4. Is Client Connected?

Check to see if the client is still connected, before starting a long-running task

if (this.Response.IsClientConnected)
{
   // long-running task
}

5. Server control properties based on target browser

<asp:Label runat="server" ID="labelText" ie:Text="This is IE text" mozilla:Text="This is Firefox text" Text="This is general text" />

6. Page.ViewStateUserKey to Counter One-Click Attacks

Consider using Page.ViewStateUserKey to counter one-click attacks. If you authenticate your callers and use ViewState, set the Page.ViewStateUserKey property in the Page_Init event handler to prevent one-click attacks.

void Page_Init (object sender, EventArgs e) {
ViewStateUserKey = Session.SessionID;
}

Set the property to a value you know is unique to each user, such as a session ID, user name, or user identifier.

A one-click attack occurs when an attacker creates a Web page (.htm or .aspx) that contains a hidden form field named __VIEWSTATE that is already filled with ViewState data. The ViewState can be generated from a page that the attacker had previously created, such as a shopping cart page with 100 items. The attacker lures an unsuspecting user into browsing to the page, and then the attacker causes the page to be sent to the server where the ViewState is valid. The server has no way of knowing that the ViewState originated from the attacker. ViewState validation and HMACs do not counter this attack because the ViewState is valid and the page is executed under the security context of the user.

By setting the ViewStateUserKey property, when the attacker browses to a page to create the ViewState, the property is initialized to his or her name. When the legitimate user submits the page to the server, it is initialized with the attacker’s name. As a result, the ViewState HMAC check fails and an exception is generated.

Check out this link for details.

7. Emails to local folder

While testing, you can have emails sent to a local folder on your computer instead of an SMTP server

 <system.net>
    <mailSettings>
        <smtp deliveryMethod="SpecifiedPickupDirectory">
            <specifiedPickupDirectory pickupDirectoryLocation="c:\EmailFolder\" />
        </smtp>
    </mailSettings>
</system.net>

This is not a complete list, but will keep adding and updating this.